CERN Accelerating science

How to access free of charge state-of-the-art accelerator testing facilities across Europe?

ARIES offers the opportunity to conduct testing at 14 European research facilities to project members through its Transnational Access programme at no cost to the user. The facilities from 5 different countries, provide equipment and administrative support in 5 separate domains: magnet testing, material testing, electron and proton beam testing, radiofrequency testing and plasma beam testing.

Who can apply? Access can be provided to selected teams composed of one or more researchers led by a User Group Leader. Leaders and the majority of users in the group must work in a country other than where the selected installation is located, except when accessing an international organisation or remotely accessing a facility.

Wondering which kind of equipment and infrastructures are available? All the details are on the ARIES website for you to find the best suited option for your research. You will be then invited to contact the facility coordinator of the chosen installation prior to completing a formal application and submit it to ARIES-TA@cern.ch. CERN, University of Uppsala, GSI, KIT, CEA, DESY, STFC, CNRS and University of Lund will provide you with further information on the feasibility of your project.

All the projects carried on through the programme must disseminate the results acknowledging the ARIES project.

 

Several authors
CLIC technology lights the way to compact accelerators
5 Mar 2018

CLIC technology lights the way to compact accelerators

What if accelerators could be more compact and more cost-effective?

Ruben Garcia Alia, Pablo Fernandez Martinez ‎and Maria Kastriotou (CERN)
Ultra-high energy heavy ion testing
12 Dec 2018

Ultra-high energy heavy ion testing

The ultra-high energy heavy ions at accelerators allows to test electronic components.

Panagiotis Charitos (CERN)
Quadrupole magnets for FCC-ee
8 Oct 2018

Quadrupole magnets for FCC-ee

First tests of a twin quadrupole magnet for FCC-ee took place last summer in CERN's new magnetic measurement laboratory.

Full length prototype of an 11T dipole magnet

The construction of the 5.5-m long 11T dipole prototype was completed in May this year after several years of intense work dedicated to the development and optimisation of the special tooling, and of the related manufacturing and inspection procedures. Most of the construction activities took place in the Large Magnet Facility in building 180 at CERN, with contributions from industry, namely Alstom Power Systems (FR), ASG Superconductors (IT), Babcock Noell (DE), and Oxford Instruments Nanotechnology Tools (UK).

The magnet is made of two apertures, as it aimed at replacing two LHC main dipoles in the dispersion suppressor regions of LHC, one on either side of IP7. The coils are made up of Nb3Sn conductor, hence necessitating reaction in an argon furnace at about 650°C for 150 hours in order to form the Nb3Sn superconductor. After this, the coils are impregnated with epoxy resin to form the cable insulation system. The prototype is currently on the test bench in building SM18 where it will be tested in the course of June-July in nominal operation conditions and further.

The prototype will be fully characterised in terms of quench behaviour, protection, field quality, stability and memory. In parallel with this, the collaring procedure has been refined within the framework of a dedicated task force initiated in the end of 2017. One of the two magnet models of 2-m length, MBHSP107, which is part of the task force deliverables, is almost finished; it will be tested at cold in July.

The results of the performance tests of both the full-length prototype and the model SP107 shall confirm the solid foundations of the project, when at the same time the series production has started in the Large Magnet Facility.

 

Romain Muller (CERN)
ARIES first annual meeting in Riga
3 Jul 2018

ARIES first annual meeting in Riga

One year after the Kick-off, where does the project stand?

Sabrina El yacoubi
How to access free of charge state-of-the-art accelerator testing facilities across Europe?
Panos Charitos (CERN)
A big step towards the superconducting magnets of the future
28 Jun 2018

A big step towards the superconducting magnets of the future

FRESCA2 reaches an important milestone, a magnetic field of 14.6 T a record for a magnet with a “free” aperture